Category: Safety

Understanding Car Recalls: Better Safe Than Sorry

By TIS Insurance Services, Inc and The Hanover

 

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With nearly one in five cars recalled by manufacturers last year, local Knoxville residents would be well advised to pay attention and quickly take action, according to a local insurance authority, TIS Insurance Services, Inc. of Knoxville, and its insurance carrier partner, The Hanover. Read more →

Car Seat Safety Tips

By TIS Insurance Services, Inc and The Hanover

 

TIS-June-WebNine out of ten parents leave the hospital with a newborn in an improperly installed car seat according to a 2014 study. To help protect your bundle of joy, TIS Insurance Services, Inc. of Knoxville and its insurance carrier partner, The Hanover, are offering tips for parents on the proper use of child restraint systems.

“When used incorrectly, child restraint systems can actually increase the risk of injury in a crash,” said Lisa Churchwell, director of public relations and communications at TIS. Churchwell stresses the importance of proper car seat use including following the recommendations from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Read more →

Safety Tips From East Tennessee Children’s Hospital

Cold-weather safety

ETCH-1 When the temperature drops, there are some important things you can do to help your child stay warm, safe, and  healthy. Here are some tips to protect your child during the colder weather. Read more →

Teach Your Children About Home Fire Safety

By American Red Cross

Red-CrossThe American Red Cross responds to nearly 70,000 disasters a year — one every eight minutes — and most are home fires. You can reduce your family’s risk of being harmed by a home fire by talking with your children about home fire safety, developing a fire escape plan, and practicing it with them several times a year. Fire experts agree that people may have as little as two minutes to escape a burning home before it’s too late to get out. Read more →

What’s Around Me?

Technology to help you find what you’re looking for this summer

by Lieutenant Aaron Yarnell, Knox County Sheriff’s Office

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Hopefully, you are you excited about the summer vacation months that are finally approaching, or perhaps you just want to get out and enjoy something different right now, something that you may not yet be aware of. If thoughts like these have entered your mind, then do I have a great app just for you! Read more →

“Be Home Before The Street Lights Come On”

By SSG James Miller, Assistant Center Commander
US Army Recruiting Center Knoxville

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In my job as an Army recruiter, I see more and more high school aged kids who do not meet the physical standards to become a soldier. When I ask these kids what kind of activities they participate in, their answers overwhelmingly include: sitting at home and playing video games or playing on their smart phones.

Being a father of two young children, I find it extremely upsetting that the level of physical activity of this generation is practically non-existent. “Be home before the street lights come on,” is a phrase that has disappeared from our vocabulary. We, as parents, need to take responsibility and ensure that our children are not denied the opportunity to live a long and healthy life. There have been numerous studies showing that physical activity extends life, and it must begin with our younger generation.  Read more →

Aquatic And Summer Pool Safety Tips

by  Alicia Williams, National Fitness Center Aquatics Director

NationalFitness1If you have children, you already know that swimming is the most popular summertime activity. As a parent, you can follow some easy steps to put your mind at ease and keep your kids safe around the pool allowing you to enjoy these activities as well. The American Red Cross recommends talking to your children and setting rules before visiting a pool. It’s important to make sure that children have a healthy respect for bodies of water, so that they are cautious about approaching them on their own.

 

“Being safe around water is largely a matter of planning ahead.”

 

Children 36 months or younger should always be supervised around water. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reports that 64% of reported pool accidents in the US occur with children between the ages of 1-3 years old. Parents should establish and enforce water safety rules with their children. Here are 10 easy Aquatic & Summer Pool Safety Tips from National Fitness Center and Court South to help you have a happy and safe summer swim season!

Aquatic & Summer Pool Safety Tips

  • Use the Buddy System: Always swim with a buddy. Do not allow anyone to swim alone.
  • Safety First: Swim in designated areas with certified lifeguards or responsible adults on duty.
  • Swimming Lessons: Ensure that everyone in your family knows how to swim well. Enroll your children in age appropriate swim lessons.
  • Start Safe: Young children or inexperienced swimmers should wear personal flotation devices, but they should not rely on these devices.
  • Be Watchful: Maintain constant supervision, avoid distractions (phones, tablets, books) when supervising children around water.
  • Follow the Rules: Establish rules for your family (rules may be different based on ability) and enforce them without fail.
  • Protect Your Skin: Wear sunscreen with a protection factor of at least 15, and limit the amount of direct sunlight you receive between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Keep it Covered: If you have a home pool, install and use barriers around your pool. Safety covers and pool alarms can provide additional protection.
  • Be Prepared: Have the appropriate safety equipment, first aid kit, reaching or throwing equipment and life jackets.
  • Save a Life: Become CPR/AED, water safety and first aid certified. Check your local NFC for certification class information.

Being safe around water is largely a matter of planning ahead. It’s important to know how to be safe while you’re in or around water. If an accident or emergency situation happens, the best thing you can to is to remain calm and to have a plan. If a child is missing, check water area first. Seconds count, and knowing how to react to a situation can mean the difference between preventing a death or disability. As a parent, one of the most important things you can do is to become CPR certified. At National Fitness Center, the basis of our aquatics programs begins with teaching water safety. All aquatics staff are lifeguard and CPR/AED certified by a nationally accredited organization.

National Fitness Center offers summer programs for kids that are sure to make it the best summer ever! Our new Signature location offers 3 pools AND an indoor fun pool with slides, so aquatic fun can be enjoyed all year round. Swimming lessons are offered for all levels and ages at all locations with aquatic facilities. National Fitness Center also hosts the NFC Sharks swim team! This program is designed for more competitive swimmers or swimmers who still need additional instruction or refined competitive stroke technique work. This program is fun, but challenging for all swimmers.  In all programs, kids will learn safety practices that will keep them safe around the water.
For more information about pool and water safety and how to be a responsible parent, be sure to visit the Red Cross website at redcross.org.

 

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AliciaWilliams
Alicia Williams is the National Fitness Center Aquatics Director. Alicia is a water safety specialist, lifeguard trainer, and CPR/AED certified instructor. She has 12 years experience of competitive swimming including a TN state high school swimming championship.

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Do You Know What Your Kids Are Downloading?


by Detective Aaron Yarnell, Knox County Sheriff’s Office

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Snap Chat me, shoot me an I.M., don’t forget it’s #tbt (Throw back Thursday) and get your guy picked out for #MCM (man crush Monday).  If these phrases are unfamiliar to you, then this article you are reading now should spark an interest in getting involved with the digital lives your children are living. The digital life I refer to is social media.  Read more →

Be a Bully Buster!

Be a Bully Buster!

By Hillary Coward, Knox County Sheriff’s Office


As you may know, October was Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, but I chose to discuss bullying this month in an effort to keep us on our toes and to help become aware of bullying year-round. This information needs to be heard by all parents. Your child could be a victim or a suspect of bullying. Both can have serious, lasting consequences.

Do you think you know how to spot bullying? Bullying comes in many forms and can be verbal, or physical. According to stopbullying.gov, bullying is “unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time.” Bullying doesn’t just happen at school. It can happen at the bus stop, on the bus, on the playground, in the neighborhood, on the phone, or on the internet. Cyberbulling, or bullying that takes place using electronic technology, is a scary reality. That’s why it’s so important to monitor our children’s phone, computer, and tablet usage. Read more →

Stop the Bullying

Helping your child cope with being teased or bullied

By Kathryn Rea Smith, PH.D.


StopBullyingNov13It’s not unusual for parents to feel at a loss when they discover their child is being teased or bullied. A host of difficult emotions may emerge—anger, sadness, or even shame. Parents may even have spontaneous memories of their own painful childhood or adolescent experiences of being teased or bullied. In order to be an effective advocate, however, parents need to set aside these emotions and work on helping their child. A parent’s task is threefold: 1) do what you can to put an end to the teasing and bullying; 2) provide your child with emotional support; and 3) help your child develop insight into the bully’s psychological makeup.

 “Due to the internalized shame associated with being teased or bullied, many children and adolescents keep silent about their experience and try to deal with it alone.”

Read more →